Wednesday, 5 February 2020

Climate Emergency maps as easy as 1-2-3

Almost 2½ years ago I blogged then presented Emergency response maps as easy as 1-2-3 - in fact that helped spur on my current venture described in previous posts - and now apply the same to do inundation maps from sea level rise as well as river run-off.
None of this would be possible without Open Data from Ordnance Survey and DEFRA this time, and ESRI UK Nonprofit Programme
 And while the previous story offered a near-real-time emergency response story, this is a forward-planning one that is equally crucial... especially in regard to fact-checked data and relative ease of use! First, it is crucially important amidst sensationalism by media, activists and deniers alike. And second, this is a positive response: don't give them fish (especially of the fishermen's story kind... exaggerated), rather teach them to fish! So much so that Sea Level Rise map from Open Data is a complete how-to free to re-use*.

Climate deniers: please stop arguing about what is real out there! Check for yourself, then critiques will be based on fact-checks... 
A complete study for East Anglia Fenlands - inundation scenarios, temperature regimes and areas affected by sea level rise and river run-off, within the scope of scientific consensus on time and magnitude - is in this blog and on Medium for carbon emissions, sea level rise and 360° view. Lessons-learned now help activists in London concerned about flooding scenarios immediately upstream of the Thames Estuary, in the Greater London Area home to almost 10M people:



From Details: Overlay Layer was applied to map Urban areas affected by OS OpenData sea level rise or DEFRA flooding from river or sea. The former is shown above, the Layers icon (hover mouse below subtitle) show the latter as well as the base information like inundation and settlement areas. Pan&zoom also to any are of interest or for planning purposes. Also the Info button will give sources and assumptions.
Comments / suggestions always welcome below, via  twitter or Linkedin

*: this follows previous class notes :
- almost two years ago re: Antarctic / Arctic historic maps respectively in QGIS / Esri  and Open Data on Dropbox
- over two years ago a web map on HMS Challenger historic expedition with complete DIY notes on the blog post
- and ten years ago on geoscience mapping using ArcMap on a groundwater mapping example also on Dropbox

1 comment:

  1. Very good post Andrew. I was glad to see your work again. We need more work and posts like this one!

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