Friday, 19 November 2021

Satellite data help for local housing issue

 The #30DayMapChallenge Day 23 challenge is "GHSL data", here is the section in the story map that will chronicle the map challenge when it's finished:

Global Human Settlement  for Northstowe controversial development NW of Cambridge UK, monitoring housing probability (GHS-BUILT-S2, 2018) and housing footprint (GHSL-ESM, 2015) against Esri 2020 Land Cover map extract with OpenStreetMap detailed base-map. Various blended overlays 'bake' the layers into a screen pattern allowing to compare and contrast past built areas vs. currently probably built against submissions. 

Liner notes


click to enlarge, or see full size

Here are in order of map posted on twitter:
  • Housing probability "map of built-up areas expressed in terms of a probability grid at 10 m spatial resolution derived from a Sentinel-2 global image composite" for 2018 in Soft Light overlay blend
  • Housing footprint, "built-up areas classification at a spatial resolution of 2 meters", shows building footprints for 2015 in Multiply overlay blend
  • Land cover in Overlay layer blend, to help see the underlying details
  • OpenStreetMap base map gives the infrastructure details that are reportedly quite current
This shows an evolution of the housing development as well as its proximity to water surfaces. These are powerful investigative tools in a relatively localized area with hi resolution and temporal satellite imagery interpretation, some of it using AI tools as detailed in the data links.

Backstory 

I first posted on this topic 5½ years ago, and concluded then that housing development was likely not on a flood plain based on the maps examined. As mentioned however, increased flooding was already an issue then, and that came back when a local activist picked up my Day 8 map challenge (wait for twitter image):

The issue was that developers were reshaping the lands in the curve of the guided busway... coincidentally at the red dot below, the area of concern way back then! As I'm also member of a Flood Watch Group with the local Parish Council, I connected said activist with an Internal Drainage Board contact who was able to investigate if planning permissions were being respected.

from original blog post

Tuesday, 19 October 2021

More map art

A few years ago I used Charlie Frye's online lesson Explore future climate projections to learn how to use NetCDF and map temperature regimes - it's shown below in Patterson & Savaric's Equal Earth Projection. It became the basis for carbon emissions map just updated in the last blog post.

Wednesday, 13 October 2021

Carbon emissions reloaded

[ Updates:  watch the updated bubble map video wrapping this all up at the bottom! ]

Late 2019 I wrote in A tale of two maps

LSE’s Leslie Sklair asked me recently to produce carbon emission snapshots for an upcoming book. I had already mapped CDIAC’s CO2 emissions since 1751, I updated with BP Stat. Review current data, and I created in Esri web mapping platform some dynamic counterparts to Carbon Atlas’ static maps.

 Those 2018 data were recently updated up to 2020, and further fuels listed by CDIAC were added to create this map, using Esri's improved web mapping:

Tuesday, 28 September 2021

Return East Anglia Peatlands to being carbon sinks

Community Engagement 12345678910111213, 141516171819 & 20

[ Update 2: see 2/12/2021 premiere of Bog Standard on community-led bog restoration projects 

Update: added Why we should all be obsessed with Peatlands at the end of the story map below ]

No. 20! Isn't it fitting that chronicling East Anglia challenges & opportunities w.r.t. climate emergency - risk of flooding, sea level rise,  vulnerability indices and now pandemic - uncovered the greatest opportunity yet: returning local peatlands from carbon emitters to original carbon sinks could dwarf any individual effort to mitigate CO2 emissions, currently the major driver of climate change.

Tuesday, 21 September 2021

Sea Level Rise Maps #reloaded

[ Update 2: at bottom is the comprehensive water web map that followed this...

Update 1: near the end of the story map, see how you can style your own DEM tiles ]

 East Anglia Flood Defences Final showcased in a story map the entire flooding infrastructure framework for the region, both from rising sea levels and risk of flooding, complete w flood defence infrastructure.

Online discussions in the wake of the IPCC 2021 report broadened that scope back to an original posting almost two years ago Sea level rise models show ins&outs of climate change science. Here is that update expanding to England and NW Europe, wrapping in all the lessons learned along the way. 

Monday, 13 September 2021

'Emo' vs. 'Goth' map looks

Recently updated this story map Maps like 3D Prints: Emo or goth? A map tour of special effects - adding to existing Ice Mountain hillshade style (augmented with Misting - the Emo part), a Sunrise Hack (in fact more like sunset - the Goth part) - all John Nelson's on Esri Living Atlas Terrain layers.

Monday, 30 August 2021

"Start me up" reloaded

[ Update: watch this creepy reprise by Rolling Stones & Boston Dynamics on the 40th anniversary of the Tattoo You album ]

The 25th anniversary of Win95 launch reminded me of the cringy launch party livestreamed where I was then in Calgary. What struck me was in Rolling Stones' lyrics including "you make grown men cry" in the launch party was clipped in later adverts... 

Tuesday, 10 August 2021

"With a little help from my friends", Part II

New how-to 

Part I showed how a map of DEFRA open data can help situational awareness for a West Midlands XR event. Having done a sea level rise and risk of flooding map for the Thames River valley near London last year, I redid one now with the lessons learned in the interval. The previous Sea Level Rise map from Open Data was rather onerous: I streamlined the process to simply load free & open data with only GIS styling; the resulting Build your own can be replicated on other GIS with listed data sources.

Wednesday, 28 July 2021

Unlocking Open Data from a legacy site

 In the process of looking at land cover per previous post, I found Natural England's Natural Capital Atlas - their story map encouraged me to enter EsriUK's latest competition - their Esri dataset is accompanied by ample documentation under data.gov. To save us reverting to ArcMap, let's use the provided layer files and a file geodatabase in three simple steps to map our own region on ArcGIS Pro.

Friday, 16 July 2021

Land cover to study East Anglia peatlands evolution

Community Engagement 12345678910111213, 1415161718 & 19

[ Update 3: next installment integrates this + companion below in peatland assessment
Update 2: see next how to re-use, clip & correct Natural England's Natural Capital Atlas
Update 1: added Living Atlas, ESA & USGS land cover and Natural England peat lands ]

Having concluded a comprehensive synopsis on risk of flooding and sea level rise, an opportunity arose to look at land cover classification with the data below and two peat land experts who will help with this.