Friday, 15 November 2019

Local Community Engagement, Part 6

Part 1 introduced this project to engage local residents in villages north of Cambridge UK. Part 2 elaborated on some resources available and communication via Story Maps. Part 3 looked at three more resources, introduced an open call and closed with an Elevator Pitch. Part 4 looked at community engagement's key differentiator, to search for local info your way, not the search engines'. Let's round this off with our own gazetteer, and then touch on issues around sea level rise maps. And Part 5 introduced our own Wikipedia Gazetteer map - jointly with Terry's Wikipedia savvy and Adrew's mapping skills - to complete our infrastructure guide of "What is in Cambridgeshire?".

In the process of looking at our environment and current climate challenges, we met Leslie Sklair an economist at London School of Economics, who helped us focus on our audience and the status of village life in the context of our County in particular and East Anglia in general. Here is what a Press Release would look like, to introduce our social enterprise. Such writing helps focus the mind, doesn't it?

Cottenham, Cambridge,  [date]

Digital nomads returning to villages from city centres as work forces get decentralised, transform Silicon Fen Edge Villages into producer-consumer co-operatives. Did you know that Cambridgeshire included no less than 270 villages? While "wifi not spots" and "high street store closures" make the headlines, little is said about rural isolation from the closure of post offices, bank branches, libraries, bus lines etc.

Cottenham.info will help combat loneliness and a sense of isolation amongst elderly residents not yet familiar with online communications and the local/ global reach it inspires.  At the other end of the age scale it will encourage millennials and digital natives in the community to introduce their contemporary skills to older generations who, in return, can pass on traditional skills, crafts and know-how to younger generations. It will encourage older residents to recount their stories with illustrations from the past and younger residents to record local history in the making. It will form alliances to drive co-production initiatives in local communities: Time Credits will be awarded to younger generations giving their time to help older ones step onto the digital ladder. They will be able to spend these on activities for their own health and well-being at sports centres for example, and for sponsored leisure-time activities such as local cinema and football matches.

Club55 in Girton is a stellar example of seniors engagement through a computer club, lunches, movies and special events. South Cambs. 2016 Village Hero Sam Clift has run the Girton Computer Club coming on ten years, and has garnered the help from the local council providing free space and wifi at St Vincent's Close. Then Minister for Digital and Culture (now Secretary of State for Health and Social Care) and neighbouring West Suffolk MP Matt Hancock visited the club as part of a national 2016 Get Online week. He quipped:
"It was fantastic to meet such an enthusiastic and engaged group and see firsthand how the internet can benefit their lives" 
(Cambridge Evening News, Tuesday 18 October 2016).


click to enlarge
Cottenham.info  proposes to address this question: "How to foster local business and community engagement, by providing open access to local geographic and environmental data that are time stamped?" Working with Cottenham Parish Council (CPC) subgroups into Wellbeing initiatives like in neighbouring Histon-Impington, and talking to others in surrounding Councils, the aim is to provide a framework for rational decision-making, to foster inter-agency cooperation that promote the well-being for local residents. This initiative is based on newly available open data that help map out the infrastructure so that visitors can find businesses and facilities on one hand, and on the other hand, so that local businesses can promote their location and offering.

Thursday, 3 October 2019

Local community engagement, Part 5

[Update: Part 6 shows a draft Press Release introducing our social enterprise]

Part 1 introduced this project to engage local residents in villages north of Cambridge UK. Part 2 elaborated on some resources available and communication via Story Maps. Part 3 looked at three more resources, introduced an open call and closed with an Elevator Pitch. Part 4 looked at community engagement's key differentiator, to search for local info your way, not the search engines'. Let's round this off with our own gazetteer, and then touch on issues around sea level rise maps.

Sunday, 8 September 2019

Local community engagement, Part 4

[Update: Part 5 adds our own Wikipedia Gazetteer as we build up the local landscape]

Part 1 introduced this project to engage local residents in villages north of Cambridge UK. Part 2 elaborated on some resources available and communication via Story Maps. Part 3 looked at three more resources, introduced an open call and closed with an Elevator Pitch. Let's look now at community engagement's key differentiator: Search for local info your way, not the search engines'

Monday, 19 August 2019

Local community engagement, Part 3

[Update: please see the follow-up post expand on our aim in community engagement.]

Part 1 introduced the project to engage local residents in villages north of Cambridge UK. Part 2 elaborated on some resources available and communication via Story Maps. Let's look at three more resources, Three I's of County Planning,  Top Ten tips for Policy Mapping and Smart Cities are decades away but open cities are within reach, then introduce OpenActive's open call, and close with an Elevator Pitch coming from all this.


Saturday, 13 July 2019

Community, climate and maps (updated)

[Update1: Northwest Passage: Maps and words adds more illustrations and better maps
Update2: see also this video Arctic Sea Ice Summer based on improved maps above
Update 3: further story map Fire & Ice - Arctic past and future climes focused onshore]

You know you're onto something when your activities converge like so:
  • ever since geologising in the Arctic 30 yrs ago, about the time of initial finds of Franklin lost expedition by Owen Beattie
  • finding out while up there that there was a cat&mouse game between Americans and Canadians over the Northwest Passage
  • recently mapping historic tall ships climate data, as a complement to more recent & land based data, now that it's absolutely critical we better understand climate dynamics
  • using a sea-level rise map resulting from polar ice melts to raise awareness of the climate emergency at a recent Extinction Rebellion event in my hometown

Friday, 31 May 2019

Local Community Engagement, Part 2

[Update: please see the follow-up post as we build a story introducing the community.]

After introducing this social enterprise, let's look at some progress: We joined the Esri(UK) Non Profit, Ordnance Survey Data Hub and Open Street Map programs, all designed to help communities'  open data initiatives key to the next economy.

Monday, 25 March 2019

Local community engagement, Part 1

[Update: please see the follow-up post as we build a story introducing the community.]

This follows my transition introduced last September and last month. I first used Esri  web mapping tools to help me canvass for EU elections in my local community five years ago. I then found local community engagement - online in my old Texan hometown of Houston - 18 months ago with Hurricane Harvey. I presented social aspects  afforded GIS at Esri European Petroleum GIS  conference in London that fall.

Wednesday, 13 February 2019

Welcome to new friends

[Update: read here my  new occupation following this]

A fond farewell to two old friends explained my transition to open source platforms. As announced in LinkedIn You can get Andrew out of the geo... (... but you can't get the geo out of Andrew) "Terry Jackson pulled me back in to the publishing business as a data wrangler". What does that mean?

Wednesday, 30 January 2019

Dynamic maps - finis

My last post on dynamic maps and its preceding project recap five years ago outlined how I used ¼M point free-to-use dataset on global historic shipping and climate data. This is the original video of ships'  locations produced a decade ago on Esri ArcMap:

Saturday, 29 December 2018

Challenger Expedition DIY Web Map

The last two blogposts showed how to create correct polar maps in ArcGIS and QGIS: here from publicly posted class notes blogged, and here to create simple climate & vegetation maps in ArcGIS Online (AGOL) from Esri Living Atlas data.

Let's look at now creating complete maps in AGOL from publicly available data, and analyzing it over time to see their historic significance. This results in this web map of the HMS Challenger 1873-1876 Expedition: