Tuesday, 15 November 2022

"I'm baaaack"

 After a year hiatus (see herehere), I have decided I'm not leaving the UK after all. As a result:

  •  on ArcGIS Online look for azolnaiadmin and devzolnai 👉 my Living Atlas contribution! 
  • I restored my ESRI(UK) Non Profit Oraganization account with Terry Jackson - see cottenham.info in banner ribbon menu - so my story maps and posted maps should all be restored too
    👉 my Developer account never left, see my perso. & prof. portfolios, top R on desktop browser 
  • despite news swirling around twitter, I reluctantly rejoined @azolnai, but this time will carefully curate it in the geo space - one issue before, was that I really should've split professional (GIS) and socials (activism) - made it "pro" under Community, but I will not pay to get "blue-badged"! 

Warm-up map

As  I was revsiting ArcGIS Online Living Atlas pages - mostly to check mine here  - I found this cool geologic map of France: I'm a former geologist and a French national - even had a necktie printed with same once! - so it was a great delight to repost it with John Nelson's blended mode - I wrote about here and here -  to highlight France's varied topography... which is of course created by the underlying geology!

Here is the tweet:

Or view it directly:




"Horses for courses"...

... or "different strokes for different folks": I did a simple map in Google Map Maker, either posting locations with no attribute directly from Google Map (WhatsApp group locations), or by importing simple spresdheets of location / item / attribute (Family). 

Note: not turned on by default is "Where is Andrew", ye olde Google sample maps  having all expired Java APIs: That web page is crawled back to 09/28/2010 on Wayback Machine, but update date in lower left had corner shows 11/19/2009... almost exactly 13 yrs ago!

Here is the tweet:



Or view it directly here:


Zoom in -  the embed doesn't respect zoom level 3 - or click on the link in the tweet above, and in the menu ladder icon you find a "Zoom to viewport" that adjusts map to window.

Saturday, 24 September 2022

"So long and thanks for the maps" - Pt. III

Following on the listings in the previous post, lets revisit some blog stats Google handily collects for us! This is an update from two years ago:

... We hit the 13 year and exceeded the half million hits mark!

Friday, 16 September 2022

Friday, 8 July 2022

"Something happened on my way north from Londonium..."

 ... said Caïus, "this young noble went charging by in his chariot, but 20 milia north between the tumulus and the circular fort ruins, I had to retrieve him from the bushes... His chariots had crashed going straight and missing the jog in the road". "Jog in the road?" asks Severus. "Yes", replies Caïus, "the road is misaligned NW and SW at that point, and there's a 20 pedes section at a sharp angle joining them". "How odd" retorts Severus, "We build perfect roads... why that misalignment? Did the Gods have fun and push them aside to catch speeding charioteers? Surely the indigenous, if there are any, couldn't sabotage a road: they barely build huts of reeds, never mind challenging our glorious engineering... Ave, Caesar!", he salutes, "I must go." [Click images to enlarge]

Friday, 20 May 2022

Fun with puzzle maps

 Look what I found!

Having taken a vacation from work and social media, I found a puzzle box in my late Dad’s old office, while visiting my Mum:

The Puzzle of the Plates
Spilhaus Repeating World Maps
1985 American Geophysical Union 
Created by Athelstan  Spilhaus

Monday, 10 January 2022

"So long and thanks for the maps"

"So long and thanks for all the fish, I meant maps (apologies to Douglas Adams)" was the last post in my #30DayMapChallenge reported below, not incl. an extra one at the end. As my life situation has changed, however, this proved to be prophetic: I'm withdrawing from social media, activism and geo work until I sort my life out. It’s been a pleasure participating in mappy adventures with y’all. Ta for now.

Friday, 19 November 2021

Satellite data help for local housing issue

 The #30DayMapChallenge Day 23 challenge is "GHSL data", here is the section in the story map that will chronicle the map challenge when it's finished:

Global Human Settlement  for Northstowe controversial development NW of Cambridge UK, monitoring housing probability (GHS-BUILT-S2, 2018) and housing footprint (GHSL-ESM, 2015) against Esri 2020 Land Cover map extract with OpenStreetMap detailed base-map. Various blended overlays 'bake' the layers into a screen pattern allowing to compare and contrast past built areas vs. currently probably built against submissions. 

Tuesday, 19 October 2021

More map art

A few years ago I used Charlie Frye's online lesson Explore future climate projections to learn how to use NetCDF and map temperature regimes - it's shown below in Patterson & Savaric's Equal Earth Projection. It became the basis for carbon emissions map just updated in the last blog post.

Wednesday, 13 October 2021

Carbon emissions reloaded

[ Updates:  watch the updated bubble map video wrapping this all up at the bottom! ]

Late 2019 I wrote in A tale of two maps

LSE’s Leslie Sklair asked me recently to produce carbon emission snapshots for an upcoming book. I had already mapped CDIAC’s CO2 emissions since 1751, I updated with BP Stat. Review current data, and I created in Esri web mapping platform some dynamic counterparts to Carbon Atlas’ static maps.

 Those 2018 data were recently updated up to 2020, and further fuels listed by CDIAC were added to create this map, using Esri's improved web mapping:

Tuesday, 28 September 2021

Return East Anglia Peatlands to being carbon sinks

Community Engagement 12345678910111213, 141516171819 & 20

[ Update 4: actual Fenlanders interviewed in this fab blog post

Update 3: peatland restoration by numbers, Indonesian example

Update 2: soil degradation and climate change masterclass, TEDtalk pointers

Update: added Why we should all be obsessed with Peatlands at the end of the story map below ]

No. 20! Isn't it fitting that chronicling East Anglia challenges & opportunities w.r.t. climate emergency - risk of flooding, sea level rise,  vulnerability indices and now pandemic - uncovered the greatest opportunity yet: returning local peatlands from carbon emitters to original carbon sinks could dwarf any individual effort to mitigate CO2 emissions, currently the major driver of climate change.