Sunday, 8 December 2019

Local Community Engagement, Part 8

Part 1 introduced this project to engage local residents in villages north of Cambridge UK. Part 2 elaborated on some resources available and communication via Story Maps. Part 3 looked at three more resources, introduced an open call and closed with an Elevator Pitch. Part 4 looked at community engagement's key differentiator, to search for local info your way, not the search engines'. Part 5 introduced our own Wikipedia Gazetteer map to complete our infrastructure guide of "What is in Cambridgeshire?" Part 6 is a manifesto of sorts, in the form of a draft press release. And Part 7 mapped the new shoreline following potential sea level rise from polar ice melt this century.

Temperature

The next question is what temperature regime will follow in that same time frame? Open data to the rescue again! UK Met Office Hadley Centre Climate Projection (UKCP) has modelled possible future temperature changes and posted their products here with guidance here. Let's look at the maximun air temperature anomalies at their highest resolution (2.2 km. sq.) for East Anglia for the net 20 years. See details at bottom.



These are the highest anomalies for summertime temperatures, ranging from 2.0 to 2.8°C. Toggle the layers in pairs to see autumn, winter and spring anomalies. Click on the dots to get individual  readings.

See the tapering off from SW to NE, from inland urban toward coastal  areas. Like the previous post, this gives us a fix on ranges and time frames. More scenarios are available and I may post a workflow  to help you derive your own from UK Met Office open data.

Summary

Here are the statistics posted on Cottenham Open shared drive here. See how even the least aggressive could put temperature anomaly projections well beyond IPCC recommendations. Note that these are probabilistic projections. Temperatures mapped above are actual projections and thus more constrained. We attempt here to impart some real data and explain all caveats.

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(click to enlarge)

Tech details: UKCP map the anomalies for local (2.2km) projections regridded to 5km over UK for Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 only, for  2021-2040 for all ensemble members on 1981-2000 baseline. In RCP 8.5, emissions continue to rise throughout the 21st century.

Wednesday, 27 November 2019

Local Community Engagement, Part 7

[Update: Part 8 on temperature anomaly scenarios adds further parameters in the debate.]

Part 1 introduced this project to engage local residents in villages north of Cambridge UK. Part 2 elaborated on some resources available and communication via Story Maps. Part 3 looked at three more resources, introduced an open call and closed with an Elevator Pitch. Part 4 looked at community engagement's key differentiator, to search for local info your way, not the search engines'. Part 5 introduced our own Wikipedia Gazetteer map to complete our infrastructure guide of "What is in Cambridgeshire?" And Part 6 is a manifesto of sorts, in the form of a draft press release.

Friday, 15 November 2019

Local Community Engagement, Part 6

[Update: Part 7 on coastal inundation scenarios adds some parameters in the debate.]

Part 1 introduced this project to engage local residents in villages north of Cambridge UK. Part 2 elaborated on some resources available and communication via Story Maps. Part 3 looked at three more resources, introduced an open call and closed with an Elevator Pitch. Part 4 looked at community engagement's key differentiator, to search for local info your way, not the search engines'. Let's round this off with our own gazetteer, and then touch on issues around sea level rise maps. And Part 5 introduced our own Wikipedia Gazetteer map - jointly with Terry's Wikipedia savvy and Adrew's mapping skills - to complete our infrastructure guide of "What is in Cambridgeshire?".

Thursday, 3 October 2019

Local community engagement, Part 5

[Update: Part 6 shows a draft Press Release introducing our social enterprise]

Part 1 introduced this project to engage local residents in villages north of Cambridge UK. Part 2 elaborated on some resources available and communication via Story Maps. Part 3 looked at three more resources, introduced an open call and closed with an Elevator Pitch. Part 4 looked at community engagement's key differentiator, to search for local info your way, not the search engines'. Let's round this off with our own gazetteer, and then touch on issues around sea level rise maps.

Sunday, 8 September 2019

Local community engagement, Part 4

[Update: Part 5 adds our own Wikipedia Gazetteer as we build up the local landscape]

Part 1 introduced this project to engage local residents in villages north of Cambridge UK. Part 2 elaborated on some resources available and communication via Story Maps. Part 3 looked at three more resources, introduced an open call and closed with an Elevator Pitch. Let's look now at community engagement's key differentiator: Search for local info your way, not the search engines'

Monday, 19 August 2019

Local community engagement, Part 3

[Update: please see the follow-up post expand on our aim in community engagement.]

Part 1 introduced the project to engage local residents in villages north of Cambridge UK. Part 2 elaborated on some resources available and communication via Story Maps. Let's look at three more resources, Three I's of County Planning,  Top Ten tips for Policy Mapping and Smart Cities are decades away but open cities are within reach, then introduce OpenActive's open call, and close with an Elevator Pitch coming from all this.


Saturday, 13 July 2019

Community, climate and maps (updated)

[Update1: Northwest Passage: Maps and words adds more illustrations and better maps
Update2: see also this video Arctic Sea Ice Summer based on improved maps above
Update 3: further story map Fire & Ice - Arctic past and future climes focused onshore]

You know you're onto something when your activities converge like so:
  • ever since geologising in the Arctic 30 yrs ago, about the time of initial finds of Franklin lost expedition by Owen Beattie
  • finding out while up there that there was a cat&mouse game between Americans and Canadians over the Northwest Passage
  • recently mapping historic tall ships climate data, as a complement to more recent & land based data, now that it's absolutely critical we better understand climate dynamics
  • using a sea-level rise map resulting from polar ice melts to raise awareness of the climate emergency at a recent Extinction Rebellion event in my hometown

Friday, 31 May 2019

Local Community Engagement, Part 2

[Update: please see the follow-up post as we build a story introducing the community.]

After introducing this social enterprise, let's look at some progress: We joined the Esri(UK) Non Profit, Ordnance Survey Data Hub and Open Street Map programs, all designed to help communities'  open data initiatives key to the next economy.

Monday, 25 March 2019

Local community engagement, Part 1

[Update: please see the follow-up post as we build a story introducing the community.]

This follows my transition introduced last September and last month. I first used Esri  web mapping tools to help me canvass for EU elections in my local community five years ago. I then found local community engagement - online in my old Texan hometown of Houston - 18 months ago with Hurricane Harvey. I presented social aspects  afforded GIS at Esri European Petroleum GIS  conference in London that fall.

Wednesday, 13 February 2019

Welcome to new friends

[Update: read here my  new occupation following this]

A fond farewell to two old friends explained my transition to open source platforms. As announced in LinkedIn You can get Andrew out of the geo... (... but you can't get the geo out of Andrew) "Terry Jackson pulled me back in to the publishing business as a data wrangler". What does that mean?