Thursday, 29 March 2018

Historic climate data revisited - 2 - circum-Arctic

[Note: Follow-on class materials the last two blogposts generated are posted here.
Go also to section 5: Arctic / Antarctica GIS application, of 1000 GIS applications ]

Following on the Antarctic blogpost, I took my lessons-learned to the antipodes for these reasons:

Wednesday, 21 March 2018

Historic climate data revisited - 1 - circum-Antarctic

[Update: please see a mirror project for the Arctic in Part 2.]

With ongoing debates whether Antarctic ice in increasing or not, and its effect on climate change, we must avail ourselves of as much data as we can. If historic climate data is at hand, not only do they get scarcer going farther back, but 1880 also marks a time prior to which their reliability falls off.

So having mapped climate data off tall ships captains logs from 1750 to 1850, I wondered how far south they sailed, and how much they augmented historic climate data around the Antarctic?

Friday, 16 March 2018

"Qui peut le plus, peut le moins" or "Horses for courses"

These quips mean that, while we may have great tools for complex workflows, such as Mapping Well Data I'll present as AAPG Visiting Geoscientist in Hungary next month, sometimes it's better to pare it down to its simplest form, such as for a friend "looking to map addresses to [a French geographic subdivision]".

Friday, 2 March 2018

Development of Spatial Grids and...

The Association for Geographic Information Geocom2017 gathered at the Geographical Society in London late last October. Its Lightning Talks showcased new ideas and businesses. I was invited there to challenge attendees "to think about the development of spatial grids and the structure of spatial data models". The presentation itself and thank-you letter were followed by a short report in GIS Professional scanned here: