Friday, 16 March 2018

"Qui peut le plus, peut le moins" or "Horses for courses"

These quips mean that, while we may have great tools for complex workflows, such as Mapping Well Data I'll present as AAPG Visiting Geoscientist in Hungary next month, sometimes it's better to pare it down to its simplest form, such as for a friend "looking to map addresses to [a French geographic subdivision]".

Full meal deal

This petroleum workflow (step-by-step here) is common to day-to-day operations: download unformatted well data, load it into a petrodata standard format, and post on a map &/or on the web with attendant infrastructure:

[Click all images to enlarge]


And load:


The address workflow consisted of spotting points handed as a CSV file, within a perimeter handed as a JSON file. My friend has no geodata tools and looked at it as a Big Data exercise: The sample has thousands and hundreds of address and perimeter points, respectively, but the study area may have an order of magnitude or two more... like my Tall ships historic weather map at local scale!

Address file to GIS:

Convert JSON file:

Perimeter & intersect:

Overlay and output:

"Ben Franklin"

That's when two item lists to compare, are shown against relevant criteria (a variant is to have one item list, shown against pros & cons). Reading cadastral files from can be done with professional tools like in the first exercise.

The point here, however, is a lowest-barrier-to-entry for geo-processing, which is but a means to an end...

And there may be other tools, say R and Python to do that directly, but then again that's another skillset business users may/not have:

"Look before you leap"

The reason I teamed up with LINQ, is to provide a listen-and-process tool, from which will cascade the workflows then, and only then the tools. These are two examples from the top and the bottom range of the tech stack to meet specific day-to-day business operational needs.

Note: the petroleum workflow is widely posted, and available under Creative Commons. The address workflow is not, as suggested by the anonymised illustrations.

Friday, 2 March 2018

Development of Spatial Grids and...

The Association for Geographic Information Geocom2017 gathered at the Geographical Society in London late last October. Its Lightning Talks showcased new ideas and businesses. I was invited there to challenge attendees "to think about the development of spatial grids and the structure of spatial data models". The presentation itself and thank-you letter were followed by a short report in GIS Professional scanned here: